Mar 16, 2014; Minneapolis, MN, USA; Sacramento Kings guard Isaiah Thomas (22) dribbles in the third quarter against the Minnesota Timberwolves at Target Center. The Minnesota Timberwolves win 104-102. Mandatory Credit: Brad Rempel-USA TODAY Sports

NBA free agency: Isaiah Thomas to visit Suns

The Phoenix Suns appear unlikely to add forward or wing depth, but they very well could spend a bit of their cap space shoring up what’s already their strongest position. Yahoo! Sports’ Adrian Wojnarowski reports that Sacramento Kings point guard Isaiah Thomas will visit Phoenix on Thursday. Paul Coro confirmed the restricted free agent’s visit and detailed the Suns’ vision of having a three point guard lineup.

Thomas, especially after the Tyler Ennis draft pick, would appear to be a repetitive choice for Phoenix. There would, however, be space for him if locker room favorite Ish Smith would be allowed to walk, as he is on a non-guaranteed deal. Last year, Smith changed the complexion of games with his speed off the bench, and Thomas would provide that same type of tempo-controlling influence — with the ability to score at the rim and via the jumper.

My personal perspective on Thomas is well-chronicled. During Thomas’ college days, Arizona head coach called Thomas a “little monster” in reference to how much the former Washington Husky dictated the tempo of the game, and that was before Thomas beat Arizona via a step-back jumper in overtime of a Pac-10 Championship game.

Thomas averaged 20.3 points and 6.3 assists per game last season with Sacramento and has shot 36 percent from three-point range over the course of his career. The 5-foot-9, 25-year-old is projected by ESPN’s Amin Elhassan at an annual average value around just $4 million per year, but the issue then is that Thomas could be asking for $8-9 million annually.

In short, Thomas’ offensive excellence is perhaps leveled to a degree because of his size and lack of defensive capabilities. The Suns would pay quite a bit to make him their third guard, but he wouldn’t then be tasked with locking down on starting point guards for long stretches.

Could the Suns’ money be better spent elsewhere?

At this point this summer, it’d be hard to find where “elsewhere” might be.

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